Happy #TurtleTuesday from the most abundant sea turtle species in the world: the olive ridley turtle.
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Olive ridley turtles are one of the smallest sea turtle species at only 2 to 2.5 feet long and 80 to 110 pounds. They are named for the olive coloration of their heart-shaped shells and known for their impressive mass nesting aggregations called arribadas (meaning ""arrival"" in Spanish). Arribadas are best seen in Mexico, India, Nicaragua and Costa Rica. On Indian beaches alone, upward of 521,000 nests are laid every year.
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Though they are relatively abundant, olive ridley turtles are still vulnerable to extinction and face a number of man-made threats, including turtle harvesting, egg poaching and nest destruction on beaches. They are susceptible to entanglement from ghost gear (fishing nets discarded in the ocean), and suffocation and starvation from marine debris. Nesting site degradation from coastal developments and climate change threaten the survival of future olive ridley populations, as well. And olive ridley turtles are killed as bycatch in some commercial fisheries. Unable to escape from these hooks and nets, the turtles drown.
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Last year, Oceana was able to pass a law in California to phase out of the use of deadly drift gillnets, but more needs to be done. Follow the link in our bio to donate to Oceana today and help support our efforts to phase out drift gillnets in ALL U.S. waters.
#turtle #turtles #turtle🐢 #turtlelover #seaturtle#greenseaturtle #greenturtle #seaturtles #turtlelove#turtlelife #turtlelovers #turtlesofinstagram#turtleconservation #turtletime #girlswhoscuba#amazingsea #museoatlantico #secretbeach#sealifeoceanworld #crystalclearwaters#blueseaview #soundofthesea #oceanphotography#freedivers #divetravel #marinelife #ilovethesea#lovethesea #seaaddict Happy #TurtleTuesday from the most abundant sea turtle species in the world: the olive ridley turtle.
.
Olive ridley turtles are one of the smallest sea turtle species at only 2 to 2.5 feet long and 80 to 110 pounds. They are named for the olive coloration of their heart-shaped shells and known for their impressive mass nesting aggregations called arribadas (meaning ""arrival"" in Spanish). Arribadas are best seen in Mexico, India, Nicaragua and Costa Rica. On Indian beaches alone, upward of 521,000 nests are laid every year.
.
Though they are relatively abundant, olive ridley turtles are still vulnerable to extinction and face a number of man-made threats, including turtle harvesting, egg poaching and nest destruction on beaches. They are susceptible to entanglement from ghost gear (fishing nets discarded in the ocean), and suffocation and starvation from marine debris. Nesting site degradation from coastal developments and climate change threaten the survival of future olive ridley populations, as well. And olive ridley turtles are killed as bycatch in some commercial fisheries. Unable to escape from these hooks and nets, the turtles drown.
.
Last year, Oceana was able to pass a law in California to phase out of the use of deadly drift gillnets, but more needs to be done. Follow the link in our bio to donate to Oceana today and help support our efforts to phase out drift gillnets in ALL U.S. waters.
#turtle #turtles #turtle🐢 #turtlelover #seaturtle#greenseaturtle #greenturtle #seaturtles #turtlelove#turtlelife #turtlelovers #turtlesofinstagram#turtleconservation #turtletime #girlswhoscuba#amazingsea #museoatlantico #secretbeach#sealifeoceanworld #crystalclearwaters#blueseaview #soundofthesea #oceanphotography#freedivers #divetravel #marinelife #ilovethesea#lovethesea #seaaddict Happy #TurtleTuesday from the most abundant sea turtle species in the world: the olive ridley turtle.
.
Olive ridley turtles are one of the smallest sea turtle species at only 2 to 2.5 feet long and 80 to 110 pounds. They are named for the olive coloration of their heart-shaped shells and known for their impressive mass nesting aggregations called arribadas (meaning ""arrival"" in Spanish). Arribadas are best seen in Mexico, India, Nicaragua and Costa Rica. On Indian beaches alone, upward of 521,000 nests are laid every year.
.
Though they are relatively abundant, olive ridley turtles are still vulnerable to extinction and face a number of man-made threats, including turtle harvesting, egg poaching and nest destruction on beaches. They are susceptible to entanglement from ghost gear (fishing nets discarded in the ocean), and suffocation and starvation from marine debris. Nesting site degradation from coastal developments and climate change threaten the survival of future olive ridley populations, as well. And olive ridley turtles are killed as bycatch in some commercial fisheries. Unable to escape from these hooks and nets, the turtles drown.
.
Last year, Oceana was able to pass a law in California to phase out of the use of deadly drift gillnets, but more needs to be done. Follow the link in our bio to donate to Oceana today and help support our efforts to phase out drift gillnets in ALL U.S. waters.
#turtle #turtles #turtle🐢 #turtlelover #seaturtle#greenseaturtle #greenturtle #seaturtles #turtlelove#turtlelife #turtlelovers #turtlesofinstagram#turtleconservation #turtletime #girlswhoscuba#amazingsea #museoatlantico #secretbeach#sealifeoceanworld #crystalclearwaters#blueseaview #soundofthesea #oceanphotography#freedivers #divetravel #marinelife #ilovethesea#lovethesea #seaaddict

Happy  #TurtleTuesday from the most abundant sea turtle species in the world: the olive ridley turtle.
.
Olive ridley turtles are one of the smallest sea turtle species at only 2 to 2.5 feet long and 80 to 110 pounds. They are named for the olive coloration of their heart-shaped shells and known for their impressive mass nesting aggregations called arribadas (meaning ""arrival"" in Spanish). Arribadas are best seen in Mexico, India, Nicaragua and Costa Rica. On Indian beaches alone, upward of 521,000 nests are laid every year.
.
Though they are relatively abundant, olive ridley turtles are still vulnerable to extinction and face a number of man-made threats, including turtle harvesting, egg poaching and nest destruction on beaches. They are susceptible to entanglement from ghost gear (fishing nets discarded in the ocean), and suffocation and starvation from marine debris. Nesting site degradation from coastal developments and climate change threaten the survival of future olive ridley populations, as well. And olive ridley turtles are killed as bycatch in some commercial fisheries. Unable to escape from these hooks and nets, the turtles drown.
.
Last year, Oceana was able to pass a law in California to phase out of the use of deadly drift gillnets, but more needs to be done. Follow the link in our bio to donate to Oceana today and help support our efforts to phase out drift gillnets in ALL U.S. waters.
#turtle  #turtles  #turtle🐢  #turtlelover  #seaturtle #greenseaturtle  #greenturtle  #seaturtles  #turtlelove #turtlelife  #turtlelovers  #turtlesofinstagram #turtleconservation  #turtletime  #girlswhoscuba #amazingsea  #museoatlantico  #secretbeach #sealifeoceanworld  #crystalclearwaters #blueseaview  #soundofthesea  #oceanphotography #freedivers  #divetravel  #marinelife  #ilovethesea #lovethesea  #seaaddict

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