2 December, 2019
LETTERING TIP: Here’s another trick I’ll elaborate on during my Spencerian Lettering workshop this weekend Dec. 7–8 @coopertype in NYC.
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When an elliptical form joins a stem in a script style like this, the axis of the bowl (enclosed counterform) requires an angle that’s slightly greater than the general slope of the letterforms. This adjustment grounds the curved stroke by keeping more of its weight toward the bottom, preventing the oval shape from appearing to rotate backward away from the stem. It also allows the two components to meet above the center of the letterform (indicated by the arrow), which is characteristic of high-contrast formal script.
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In the second image, the axis of the elliptical bowl matches the angle of the stem. This distributes the volume of the curved stroke more evenly throughout, ultimately causing the letter to appear upright, stiff, and boring. Another unwanted result is the joining of the two components at the center (indicated by the arrow), which ruins the subtle tension necessary to give a sense of liveliness to Spencerian Lettering forms, like the one I’ve drawn here.
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For those paying close attention, you may have noticed that the right side of the bowl just kisses the left side of the vertical stem, creating distinct “ink traps.” This feature —along with the thin exaggerated hairline “entry stroke” at the very top of the right stem— is a hallmark of Spencerian Lettering, which was innovated by Tom Carnase with Herb Lubalin during the late 1960s.
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Sign up for my class using the link in my bio to learn more!
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#spencerian #script #lettering #handlettering #workshop #coopertype #cooperunion #nyc #newyork #newyorkcity #logo #design #graphicdesign #typography #type #nottype #font #notafont LETTERING TIP: Here’s another trick I’ll elaborate on during my Spencerian Lettering workshop this weekend Dec. 7–8 @coopertype in NYC.
•
When an elliptical form joins a stem in a script style like this, the axis of the bowl (enclosed counterform) requires an angle that’s slightly greater than the general slope of the letterforms. This adjustment grounds the curved stroke by keeping more of its weight toward the bottom, preventing the oval shape from appearing to rotate backward away from the stem. It also allows the two components to meet above the center of the letterform (indicated by the arrow), which is characteristic of high-contrast formal script.
•
In the second image, the axis of the elliptical bowl matches the angle of the stem. This distributes the volume of the curved stroke more evenly throughout, ultimately causing the letter to appear upright, stiff, and boring. Another unwanted result is the joining of the two components at the center (indicated by the arrow), which ruins the subtle tension necessary to give a sense of liveliness to Spencerian Lettering forms, like the one I’ve drawn here.
•
For those paying close attention, you may have noticed that the right side of the bowl just kisses the left side of the vertical stem, creating distinct “ink traps.” This feature —along with the thin exaggerated hairline “entry stroke” at the very top of the right stem— is a hallmark of Spencerian Lettering, which was innovated by Tom Carnase with Herb Lubalin during the late 1960s.
•
Sign up for my class using the link in my bio to learn more!
•
#spencerian #script #lettering #handlettering #workshop #coopertype #cooperunion #nyc #newyork #newyorkcity #logo #design #graphicdesign #typography #type #nottype #font #notafont

LETTERING TIP: Here’s another trick I’ll elaborate on during my Spencerian Lettering workshop this weekend Dec. 7–8 @coopertype in NYC.

When an elliptical form joins a stem in a script style like this, the axis of the bowl (enclosed counterform) requires an angle that’s slightly greater than the general slope of the letterforms. This adjustment grounds the curved stroke by keeping more of its weight toward the bottom, preventing the oval shape from appearing to rotate backward away from the stem. It also allows the two components to meet above the center of the letterform (indicated by the arrow), which is characteristic of high-contrast formal script.

In the second image, the axis of the elliptical bowl matches the angle of the stem. This distributes the volume of the curved stroke more evenly throughout, ultimately causing the letter to appear upright, stiff, and boring. Another unwanted result is the joining of the two components at the center (indicated by the arrow), which ruins the subtle tension necessary to give a sense of liveliness to Spencerian Lettering forms, like the one I’ve drawn here.

For those paying close attention, you may have noticed that the right side of the bowl just kisses the left side of the vertical stem, creating distinct “ink traps.” This feature —along with the thin exaggerated hairline “entry stroke” at the very top of the right stem— is a hallmark of Spencerian Lettering, which was innovated by Tom Carnase with Herb Lubalin during the late 1960s.

Sign up for my class using the link in my bio to learn more!

#spencerian #script #lettering #handlettering #workshop #coopertype #cooperunion #nyc #newyork #newyorkcity #logo #design #graphicdesign #typography #type #nottype #font #notafont

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